Friday, 30 May 2008

Perspective on Mars

When campaigning for Human Rights, or getting the rough end of Life's Great Pineapple, it helps to retain some perspective. When you feel hard done by, when you really are hard done by, it can help to realise that ordinary people who have had it far worse have coped, and sometimes coped magnificently. We as a species are extraordinary, and capable of great heroism and compassion as well as poltroonery and spite.

Another thing that can help is to step back and look at the sheer wonder of the Universe we live in. We can both measure the marigolds, and also see how beautiful they are. In fact, I believe that to truly appreciate their beauty, we need to measure them first.

In an earlier post, I wrote about the Phoenix Mars Lander being caught on film as it descended.

Here's what it looks like in perspective. (click to enlarge)



Now just try to tell me our Universe isn't a wondrous place!

2 comments:

jessie-c said...

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Anonymous said...

Wow! That's just exquisite!

I wonder what it would look like in colour, though are they certain about the colour on mars yet? I recall they had trouble getting that right with the sky.

It's always been my favourite planet. Too much H.G. Wells and E.R. Burroughs in my youth perhaps. Though it's hard playing favourites when they are all fascinating in their different ways.

Once i got to go to the Parkes radio telescope visitors centre when one of the Voyager picture streams was coming in and stared at the little screen, being amongst the priviliged few to see the images as soon as they came in. My family had to just about literally drag me away from there.