Monday, 4 March 2013

The Solar System as it really is

13 comments:

Glenn Ingersoll said...

Not quite to scale, but beautiful nevertheless. We're all swirling around the sun whilst she plows ahead, eh? It's not like we're on a frisbee that's spinning around the galaxy?

Angel said...

Combining the speed of Earth's rotation, the speed at which we're orbiting the sun, and the speed at which the entire Solar System is moving, it's easy to see why a ground speed of 88 mph is sufficient for time travel (if you have a flux capacitor and a source of 1.21 gigawatts of power).

Carolyn Ann Grant said...

Neat! (Thanks for sharing! :-) )

Billie said...

I chose to follow the link; A Trans Woman Is Beaten And Nobody Hears About It... a very good read and a very common-place occurrence. Sad.

Thanks for sharing the picture!

Anonymous said...

@Glenn Ingersoll

This simulation, by my count is on the order of 7 years.

Our galactic year is about 230 million years. Even if I mis-read the video, and it was 10 years of time, it should be moving through 1/23 millionth (.000000043) of a circle's perimeter.

That small of a curvature will look very much like a straight line.

Anonymous said...

just as it closed into the sun so i could identify the planets, its stopped and looped back to the far view.


it would be nice to be able to tag the planets, so we could follow them.

din

fiddlejig said...

Oh, awesome! Just add z!

Cynthia Lee said...

I was made aware of this a few years ago. Pretty spiffy.
It blew my mind and changed how I view the way things work. We are not orbiting as we have been originaly taught but rather 'falling' into the sun, sort of.

Anonymous said...

@Glenn- compare a Galactic Year to the timescale in this image. even if they accounted for galactic movement accurately, it would look like a straight line segment.

LaurenG said...

Moving in relation to what? The center of the galaxy?

Very neat graphic!

Stig said...

> just as it closed into the sun so i could identify the planets, its stopped and looped back to the far view.
> it would be nice to be able to tag the planets, so we could follow them.

Try going to the source's website. Many more cool animations, and you'll be able to identify the planets there.

http://www.djsadhu.com/the-helical-model-vortex-solar-system-animation/

Thanks, Zoe!

Stig

Anonymous said...

What is the angle of the planet's orbital plane to the line of the sun's trajectory?
What is the angle of the sun's axis of rotation to it's line of trajectory?

bashashhazbaz said...

this freakin' rocks! i love it!